Seeming Paradoxes

Paradoxes are related to the subject of a previous post of mine, “Training with reasonable extremes…“. Sometimes you have to think or do one thing, to get a seemingly dissimilar or even opposite thing to happen. Sometimes it’s in real time; sometimes the paradox is only seen through training over a period of time. Example: […]

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Open throat

Back when I was primarily a flutist, the “open throat” was constantly mentioned by teachers and other supposed experts. Later, when I delved into vocal pedagogy, I again ran into this phrase frequently. What does it mean? I don’t think I received an accurate definition before figuring it out myself. Since then, I have seen […]

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Conveying "legato" to students

The World English Dictionary defines legato as: “a style of playing [singing] in which no perceptible gaps are left between notes”. Random House says: “smooth and connected; without breaks between the successive tones.” I like the latter definition because it includes “smooth”. It is possible to connect notes that have rather violent boundaries between them. […]

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"Placement" in singing

This is a troublesome word in vocal pedagogy and technique. Try to get several voice teachers or singers to agree what “placement” is and you will invoke semantic chaos. As I understand it, “placement” refers to the feeling of sympathetic vibration in one’s body when the voice is resonating as it should. We all know […]

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