Resonance adjustments and playtime

Once registration is working reasonably well, one can start trying to maximize one’s vowels, also called “optimizing resonance”, among other things. I’m defining “maximized” as: a vowel that has a strong fundamental plus strong overtones, which is subjectively called things like “full”, “rich”, “complete”,  “chiaroscuro”, “resonant”, and other positive terms that imply there is a […]

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Assumptions abound

In a Facebook forum recently a “teacher” (looking at her page I saw no qualifications) asked the question: “Can someone give me examples of popular commercially successful male singers that sing high notes other than with falsetto, with a lowered larynx and lifted soft palate and good acoustic space?” Oh my. No, I can’t, because […]

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Considering Resonance

What does “resonance” mean? You can look up different dictionary definitions as well as I can, but today let’s call it “maximum sound output per energy unit expended”. Let’s assume this includes a nice distribution of overtones that gives the voice a pleasing timbre. Generally, when we sing, we are hoping to make sounds that […]

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Spectrograms and Learning to Sing

Some classical singers are using audio spectrogram programs to see if they are producing the “singer’s formant”, which is a band of harmonics in roughly the 3000 Hz range. In acquiring these overtones, it is essential to cross-check against function. It can be easy to bring these overtones in with some pretty nasty interfering tensions. […]

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Sounding “mature”

What is a mature vocal sound? In resonance-based styles such as those related to most classical singing, singers sometimes try to sound “more mature”. Some teachers encourage this. It is a mistake. Maturity is something that is earned with time and action. It is something that happens, not something you can pick up in a […]

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