Assumptions abound

In a Facebook forum recently a “teacher” (looking at her page I saw no qualifications) asked the question: “Can someone give me examples of popular commercially successful male singers that sing high notes other than with falsetto, with a lowered larynx and lifted soft palate and good acoustic space?” Oh my. No, I can’t, because […]

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But what about "middle voice"?

If we stick with Garcia’s definition of “register” as tones following a similar mechanical principle, then we have the chest (thyroarytenoid dominant) and the falsetto (cricothyroid-dominant), and that middle area that gets all kinds of names is where they dance. Sometimes one leads, sometimes the other does. Each can go to the other’s neighborhoods, but […]

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On the “mix” needed for some nonclassical styles of singing

First: Laryngeal height The way to balance a voice has often been described as a “balancing act” between the “stretcher muscles” (cricothyroid) and the “closer muscles” (mostly thyroarytenoid). This is a handy two-dimensional model, but the larynx, being a physical thing, has a third dimension, or it wouldn’t be a physical object. This other dimension […]

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Legit and non-legit

These are styles, not physiological phenomena. There may be common tendencies in the technical approaches to some songs in some styles, but there are not hard and fast rules. An attempt to try to describe belt as “constricted” reflects a misunderstanding of what an ideal performance of a belt song would sound like. Judy Garland […]

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